The Colonialism of the Present

making connections between struggles is so important.

Unsettling America

An indigenous warrior stares down a member of the Canadian military during the 1990 An indigenous warrior stares down a member of the Canadian military during the 1990 “Oka Crisis.”

By Andrew Bard Epstein, Jacobin Magazine

Scholar and activist Glen Coulthard on the connection between indigenous and anticapitalist struggles

In March 1990, armed warriors from Kanesatake — one of several Mohawk communities in Canada that constitutes the eastern-most nation of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy — erected barricades to prevent the further extension of a private golf course into their land. When a police invasion four months later ended in the death of an officer, nearly three thousand Canadian soldiers descended. Mohawks from Kahnawake blockaded the Mercier Bridge into Montreal in solidarity. A seventy-eight day standoff ensued.

For the Canadian state, this indigenous revolt — known in colonial memory as “Oka Crisis” — was one of the largest and most expensive military operations in the last half century. “From the vantage point of the colonial state,”…

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